Working Properties

Ash Properties

Ash

Somerset kiln-dried ash is available in 4/4 to 8/4

Somerset's Appalachian Advantage:

Some of the finest lumber in the world comes from the Appalachian Mountain region of the U.S., where Somerset is strategically located. The lumber is considered superior because of the benefits inherent in the location and the land. The climate is a main factor in producing the naturally superior quality. The slower growth of trees results in high growth rings, consistent grains, and strong fibers that lead to strength, durability, and beauty.

Common Uses:

Ash is commonly used for furniture, flooring, kitchen cabinets, doors, paneling, tool handles, interior joinery, and more, and ash veneers are popular in the manufacture of office furniture. Ash is also used in the manufacture of wooden baseball bats (Louisville Slugger, for example); for electric guitar bodies (and less commonly, acoustic guitar bodies); and for drum shells.

Woodworkers appreciate ash for its great finishing and machining qualities.

Visual Properties:

The sapwood of ash ranges from very light color to nearly white; the heartwood ranges from grayish brown, to light brown, to pale yellow with brown streaks. The graining is generally straight with a course, uniform texture. The appearance of ash lumber will vary according to the growing region.

Working Properties:

Ash is hard, dense, tough, and very strong while still being elastic. It machines well and is easy to use with nails, screws, and glue. It can be stained and polished to a very good finish.

Physical Properties:

White oak has a Janka Hardness Rating of 1320 (compared to red oak at 1290). Pound per pound it is considered among the strongest timber available, while also being lightweight. It has excellent shock resistance and is good for steam bending.