Working Properties

Hickory Properties

Hickory

Somerset kiln-dried hickory is available in 4/4

Somerset's Appalachian Advantage:

Some of the finest lumber in the world comes from the Appalachian Mountain region of the U.S., where Somerset is strategically located. The lumber is considered superior because of the benefits inherent in the location and the land. The climate is a main factor in producing the naturally superior quality. The slower growth of trees results in high growth rings, consistent grains, and strong fibers that lead to strength, durability, and beauty.

Common Uses:

Hickory is commonly used in the manufacture of furniture, cabinetry, flooring, tool handles, ladders, dowels, sporting goods (golf shafts, tennis racquets, bats, skis).

Visual Properties:

The sapwood of hickory is white with hints of brown; the heartwood is pale to reddish brown. Hickory is course textured with generally straight grain, but the grain can vary to wavy or irregular.

Working Properties:

Due to its properties, hickory can be difficult to machine and glue. Hickory is difficult to work with using hand or power tools, and pre-drilling is advised when using nails or screws due to the tendency for the wood to split. Hickory can be sanded and polished to a good finish.

Physical Properties:

Hickory has a Janka Hardness Rating of 1820 (compared to red oak at 1290). Hickory wood is very hard, stiff, dense and shock resistant. Its strength can vary depending on growth rate. Hickory has a high bending and crushing strength and has excellent steam bending characteristics.