Working Properties

Poplar Properties

Poplar

Somerset kiln-dried poplar is available in 4/4 to 12/4

Somerset's Appalachian Advantage:

Some of the finest lumber in the world comes from the Appalachian Mountain region of the U.S., where Somerset is strategically located. The lumber is considered superior because of the benefits inherent in the location and the land. The climate is a main factor in producing the naturally superior quality. The slower growth of trees results in high growth rings, consistent grains, and strong fibers that lead to strength, durability, and beauty.

Common Uses:

Poplar is a good choice, due to its non-splintering nature, for rough uses including the bottoms of carts and wagons. It is commonly used for flooring, cabinetry, painted furniture, framing, mouldings, millwork, drawers, toys, boxes, crates, pallets, veneers and plywood. Poplar is frequently finished to give the appearance of other woods.

Visual Properties:

Poplar sapwood displays a range of color, from creamy white to grayish to white with a yellowish tint, with sometimes brown or even with pink tones, and can be striped. The heartwood, while usually tan in color, can have a wide range of tones including slightly greenish and dark purple streaks. The grain is straight and can be woolly. The texture is fine and even.

Working Properties:

Yellow popular is easy to machine using hand and power tools, however its woolly grain can cause blunting on cutters and may require very sharp thin cutters to produce good results. It planes and turns exceptionally well. It does not shape or sand well, but does take paint, enamel and stain well (occasionally staining can result in a patchy appearance).

Physical Properties:

Poplar has a Janka Hardness Rating of 300 (compared to red oak at 1290). It is a soft and lightweight wood with medium density, low shock resistance and stiffness. It has low bending and poor steam bending properties, and medium crush strength.